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Genesis of LMR & HPR.

U.S. ROCKETS 29mm MOTOR DETAIL
U.S. ROCKETS
Motor thrust curve graphic
29mm 120 G 008 -3,6 F
"I could've had a G8!"
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Testimonial
Jerry, I got a chance to launch one of your G008 motors
this weekend. The rocket was a BT-60 Mosquito. The
liftoff was VERY cool. A nice slow liftoff, nice striaght
LOOOOONG boost. I was very impressed with the motor.

"A G3 migh be the optimal sustain motor with a rocket with
a total weght of about 5 Oz., but you would probably want
some sort of guidance anyway. Something like a G8 with a
15 second burn time might be usefull and practical."
- Alan Jones



Greg Smith's G008 rocket lifts off on a
somewhat windy day for a good straight flight.

endburner

Monocopter stuff
monocopter
G008 motor in a Monocopter "rocket". A monocopter thrusts horizontally
around a center. One side of which is the motor and a counterweight and
the other side is a single wing. The rotational motion causes lift on
the wing, raising the "rocket" vertically. It is unique because it
tends to go up a ways, hover for a while, then autorotate down, or not. A major
crowd pleaser! G008 is tailor made for this type of application.


Video of a smaller Monocopter:

Rocket Monocopter by Francis Graham et al. from Alex Thomson on Vimeo.

Link to Ace:
USR site link

Link to EMRR review:
EMRR site link

U.S. Rockets was there first with the G008.
"According to Graham, the first rocket-powered monocopter
was built in 1982-83 by Korey Kline. These started in
mid-power, but soon staged and high power versions emerged."
- Dick Stafford

Also see 29mm F007, 38mm H25, 54mm I40, 54mm K90 and 54mm K125-FS.

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